Mind Control Researchers Create Fake Link Between Unrelated Memories

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Nicholas West 
Activist Post
 

Advancements in genetics and neuroscience are undoubtedly leading toward direct methods of mind control, albeit only with good intentions … if government and establishment science can be believed. However, an array of hi-tech methods have been announced which show clear potential for negative manipulation.


Bold claims have been made by scientists that they now can use “neural dust,”  high-powered lasers, and light beamed from outside the skull to alter brain function and even turn off consciousness altogether.

But it is memory research that might be among the most troubling.

As I’ve previously suggested in other articles, our memories help us form our identity: who we are relative to where we have been. Positive or negative lessons from the past can be integrated into our present decisions, thus enabling us to form sound strategies and behaviors that can aid us in our quest for personal evolution. What if we never knew what memories were real or false? What if our entire narrative was changed by having our life’s events restructured? Or what if there were memories that were traumatic enough to be buried as a mechanism of sanity preservation, only to be brought back to us in a lab?

Research has commenced into many facets of how memory can be restructured, whether it is erasing memories, the implantation of false memories, or triggering memories of fear when none previously existed. (Source)

MIT researchers, for example previously claimed to have found the specific brain switch that links emotions to memory. MIT went on to admit that these findings could lead not only to direct intervention via manipulation of brain cells through light, but a new class of drugs to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.



Once again, memory tinkering is making the news. This time it comes from the University of Toyama, Japan, where researchers claim to have for the first time, “linked two distinct memories using completely artificial means.” I have highlighted areas of the press release below which are consistent with similar research into supposed solutions for PTSD. The same disturbing language is present that seems to indicate a desire to reverse engineer the process and create fear-based trauma.


So far, ethical boundaries seem fuzzy at best, and downright non-existent in various areas of brain study. It is a time when more light needs to shine upon this research, who is funding it, and what is permissible. Given the outrageous abuses already committed by government-directed science, and a global climate of centralized health control, we would do well to read between the lines of these announcements and prepare to become very critical of their pursuits.  


Press Release

The ability to learn associations between events is critical for survival, but it has not been clear how different pieces of information stored in memory may be linked together by populations of neurons. In a study published April 2nd in Cell Reports
, synchronous activation of distinct neuronal ensembles caused mice to artificially associate the memory of a foot shock with the unrelated memory of exploring a safe environment, triggering an increase in fear-related behavior when the mice were re-exposed to the non-threatening environment. The findings suggest that co-activated cell ensembles become wired together to link two distinct memories that were previously stored independently in the brain.


Memory is the basis of all higher brain functions, including consciousness, and it also plays an important role in psychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder,” says senior study author Kaoru Inokuchi of the University of Toyama. “By showing how the brain associates different types of information to generate a qualitatively new memory that leads to enduring changes in behavior, our findings could have important implications for the treatment of these debilitating conditions.”

Recent studies have shown that subpopulations of neurons activated during learning are reactivated during subsequent memory retrieval, and reactivation of a cell ensemble triggers the retrieval of the corresponding memory. Moreover, artificial reactivation of a specific neuronal ensemble corresponding to a pre-stored memory can modify the acquisition of a new memory, thereby generating false or synthetic memories. However, these studies employed a combination of sensory input and artificial stimulation of cell ensembles. Until now, researchers had not linked two distinct memories using completely artificial means. 


With that goal in mind, Inokuchi and Noriaki Ohkawa of the University of Toyama used a fear-learning paradigm in mice followed by a technique called optogenetics, which involves genetically modifying specific populations of neurons to express light-sensitive proteins that control neuronal excitability, and then delivering blue light through an optic fiber to activate those cells. In the behavioral paradigm, one group of mice spent six minutes in a cylindrical enclosure while another group explored a cube-shaped enclosure, and 30 minutes later, both groups of mice were placed in the cube-shaped enclosure, where a foot shock was immediately delivered. Two days later, mice that were re-exposed to the cube-shaped enclosure spent more time frozen in fear

than mice that were placed back in the cylindrical enclosure.
The researchers then used optogenetics to reactivate the unrelated memories of the safe cylinder-shaped environment and the foot shock. Stimulation of neuronal populations in memory-related brain regions called the hippocampus and amygdala, which were activated during the learning phase, caused mice to spend more time frozen in fear when they were later placed back in the cylindrical enclosure, as compared with stimulation of neurons in either the hippocampus or amygdala, or no stimulation at all. 

The findings show that synchronous activation of distinct cell ensembles can generate artificial links between unrelated pieces of information stored in memory, resulting in long-lasting changes in behavior.

By modifying this technique, we will next attempt to artificially dissociate memories that are physiologically connected,” Inokuchi says. “This may contribute to the development of new treatments for psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, whose main symptoms arise from unnecessary associations between unrelated memories.”
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31 thoughts on “Mind Control Researchers Create Fake Link Between Unrelated Memories

    http://traumadissociation.wordpress.com said:
    May 15, 2015 at 14:00

    Reblogged this on Trauma and Dissociation and commented:
    Memory research advances – but where are the ethics? More potential for psychological abuse?

    eagoodlife said:
    May 15, 2015 at 23:20

    Reblogged this on The Life Of Von and commented:
    “ethical boundaries seem fuzzy at best, and downright non-existent in various areas of brain study. It is a time when more light needs to shine upon this research, who is funding it, and what is permissible. Given the outrageous abuses already committed by government-directed science, and a global climate of centralized health control, we would do well to read between the lines of these announcements and prepare to become very critical of their pursuits. “

    […] Mind Control Researchers Create Fake Link Between Unrelated Memories. […]

    Darque said:
    May 16, 2015 at 07:43

    Reblogged this on Darque Thoughts.

    Love Mindanao (@lovemindanao) said:
    May 16, 2015 at 20:31

    our technology has really advancing that even our memories now are being manipulated… i hope this is for the good …

    Jason Panuelos said:
    May 16, 2015 at 23:19

    This is such an interesting theory! I swear if I didn’t take architecture, I would probably be a psych major. This is some sci-fi stuff! Haha 😀

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:53

      You can still study psychology 😉

    May De Jesus-Palacpac said:
    May 17, 2015 at 00:51

    I dun’now, but any form of mind manipulation for me is somehow creepy. Admittedly, though, my brain shuts down on such things, haha.

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:53

      It can be scary, but also good if we use it right

    Karen Tuazon said:
    May 17, 2015 at 05:16

    This is somewhat alarming if somebody can control you and your memories.

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:54

      Well, we need to be careful. Most things can be misused, but they can also be positive !

    FX777 Classified Articles said:
    May 17, 2015 at 07:48

    Our minds is a complex thing to dig deeper into it. This is a research for mind synchronization wherein disorders are given treatmentand solutions. Well, this is science research and study. Fernando Lachica

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:54

      Thank you for commenting!

    Papaleng Pagulong said:
    May 17, 2015 at 09:06

    Wow! this is something new to me. Technology nowadays is expanding and trying to reach anything in its path.

    Tiffany Yong said:
    May 17, 2015 at 09:08

    Wow, I’ve never thought about this with the memories being fake, unrelated… But what I can say is, there will be real and fake ones and the mind is something mysterious and amazing… Hope more research and articles can be written about this!

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:55

      I hope so too! There will probably be more and more news like these in the future:)

    sriches said:
    May 17, 2015 at 13:17

    Memory tinkering sounds very scary indeed – kudos to the researchers though. The brain is so complex!

    Russ R. said:
    May 17, 2015 at 13:55

    WOW. This is interesting but I think it’s a scary thing to do. I’m sure there is a good side but I dunno, it’s just weird to have fake memories & it’s kind of sad to have them erased but maybe, just maybe, some people would want that. Your post reminds me of the movie The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:56

      I love that movie. It makes us think: would we want to forget things or are bad memories a part of who we are ?

    Nicol Wong (@yuk_lui) said:
    May 17, 2015 at 15:22

    this was interesting to read. i always fond anything relating to the brain is interesting and theres a lot to explore

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 17, 2015 at 17:57

      It is! The brain is the most amazing thing in the universe 🙂

    I Love Paars by: Lee said:
    May 17, 2015 at 22:26

    Manipulation of brain cells using dust, wow! I dont know if its possible or what.
    I happen to have a PTSD and whenever I have high fever and/or I am rally streesed or thingking too much of a certain thing or a problem there are symptoms of a person has a ptsd i am experiencing like my head is getting big while my body is shrinking. Really weird

    Ling Tan said:
    May 18, 2015 at 02:36

    Ah, so bourne identity is not so far out there after all in today’s world… I suppose such technics have it’s place, for example to rehab repeat sex offenders or serial killers… but such news send chills down my spine, for sure.

    louisechelle said:
    May 18, 2015 at 06:21

    This topic is very interesting and very scary at the same time. Now I wonder, is this why we sometimes feel we’ve seen or been to that circumstance (de javu kind of thing)? When in fact, it was just false memories we have in mind?

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 18, 2015 at 07:17

      That is a really interesting question! I read something about déjà vu’s before and I think one of the explanation was related to our gut feeling: that we almost realize something, but not quite. But maybe our memories getting entangled might be a part of it!

    franckxethee said:
    May 18, 2015 at 11:54

    I hope they get a breakthrough on this especially on dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It can help a lot of people recover faster.

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 18, 2015 at 15:58

      Yes, i use EMDR a lot, but we still need better methods!

    3xhcch said:
    May 18, 2015 at 15:41

    Interesting, but I think this can be dangerous. I do not agree with manipulating memories. It is an invasion of person, more personally invasive than surgery. – Fred

      mirrorgirl responded:
      May 18, 2015 at 15:59

      Yes, it is easy to go too far when it comes to this! Let’s hope that we manage to use the knowledge and not abuse it!

    Kelly Chin said:
    May 18, 2015 at 17:40

    This topic needs a lot of research and detail to be able to understand how our human mind and brain works. I m not good in science.

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